Nokia 5800

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The Nokia 5800 XpressMusic, is Nokia’s latest phone from their XpressMusic series, which puts emphasize on music and multimedia playback.  With a large 3.2-inch touch screen display, and running the S60 platform for impressive feedback.

Features such as A-GPS, WiFi, HSDPA, and Bluetooth 2.0 give the Nokia 5800 very impressive communication features. The high quality 3.2-megapixel camera uses Carl Zeiss optics, and allows you to automatically geotag your photos.

Key Features

  • 3.2-inch Touch Screen Display
  • 640 x 360 Pixel Resolution (16m Colors)
  • Accelerometer (For Auto Screen Rotation)
  • WLAN 802.11 b/g
  • 3.2 Megapixel Camera (Carl Zeiss)
  • LED Flash, Geotagging Support
  • Symbian S60 5th Edition OS
  • HSDPA, WCDMA, GPRS/EDGE
  • A-GPS, Bluetooth version 2.0
  • Audio / Video Support
  • 8GB microSDHC Included
  • 111 x 51.7 x 15.5 mm, 109 g

Reviews

The revolution is already here and its name is “Nokia 5800 XpressMusic” – there will be no other similarly geared and at the same time well-balanced phone in 2009. It sports an unparalleled price/quality ratio and changes the rules for all phone makers out there, including Nokia itself.
Source: Mobile-Review

The web browser works really well. WiFi is fast, and a bit easier to deal with in this edition of S60. The music player isn’t going to wow you, but it works fine. And the camera does a decent job as well. The main features are all executed well enough for most people to be very happy with the device.
Source: MobileBurn

For Nokia’s first attempt at a touchscreen, the Nokia 5800 is pretty impressive. And I also liked the fun use of the accelerometer – when the phone rings, just turn it upside down to silence the ringing.
Source: TimesOnline

There’s plenty else to recommend the phone in addition to its music-playback capabilities. Nokia has done a good job of making commonly used programs and functions – such as the alarm clock, internet and Bluetooth connectivity – accessible with a single click, rather than buried within nested menus.
Source: Telegraph